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11th Annual Collector Car Show

Hosted by Condon Skelly Insurance, American Collectors Insurance and Heacock Classic


Every year, some of the area’s finest and prestigious classic, vintage, and antique cars/trucks congregate in South Jersey to be seen, heard, and enjoyed. This year is no different! Condon Skelly is excited to join our sister companies, American Collectors Insurance and Heacock Classic to invite automotive collectors of Antique to Exotic Cars, Trucks, and Motorcycles to register and showcase their beautiful collector vehicle at the 11th Annual Collector Car Show. The event will be held on Saturday, September 19th, 2020 at Laurel Lanes, located at 2825 NJ-73, Maple Shade Township, NJ, 08052 from 9 am to 1 pm EDT.

All show proceeds from this year’s event will be donated to Puppies Behind Bars, a charity that benefits local veterans. Puppies Behind Bars trains prison inmates to raise service dogs for wounded war veterans and first responders, as well as explosive-detection canines for law enforcement. To donate to Puppies Behind Bars, please visit: https://www.nfggive.com/guidestar/13-396938.

When donating online (the preferred method), please ensure that you entered NSM Collector Car Show in the DEDICATION field and bring your confirmation email to the show to received a food voucher good for 1 meal at Laurel Lanes on the day of the show! Please Note: No cash will be handled on site. Exact change only. A donation box will be available for contact-less cash donations.

As a result of COVID-19, participation in this year’s show will be restricted to New Jersey residents ONLY.  To adhere to CDC guidelines, all staff, participants, and spectators will be required to wear a mask and practice 6 ft of social distancing during the event.  In addition, the maximum number of vehicle entries and event attendance allowed in this year’s event will be limited.

UPDATE: Due to an overwhelmingly positive response from our New Jersey collector car enthusiasts, the registration to exhibit at our 11th Annual Collector Car Show is now closed. We are very excited to showcase these unique vehicles and hope, even if you’re not exhibiting, you’ll join us on Saturday, September 19th to bask in the beauty of these glorious machines!

Important Notes:

Rain Date for this event is Sunday, September 20th.
Event will adhere to recommended CDC and state guidelines.
Event may be postponed or cancelled based on changes in public health or governmental guidelines.
Event updates will be available on our website and social media.

For more host venue information, center safety guidelines and protocols, please visit: laurellanesnj.com

Posted in: blog, Classic Car Insurance  

Flood Action Plan: 10 Steps to Get You and Your Car Back on the Road

Since 1967, we have been helping our customers protect their classics with affordable, industry-leading insurance coverage. We know that preparing for an approaching storm can be stressful, and we want to remind you of some steps you can take if your vehicle is damaged or exposed to flooding.

Don’t wait for the adjuster to arrive. In a catastrophe, it may be days until an adjuster arrives due to the concentrated work load in the affected areas. By taking the following 10 steps, you will in no way jeopardize your claim, and you will set the stage for a better outcome once the claim is established.

1. Mechanical systems and the interior can be dried out and cleaned.

2. Take pictures to establish visual damage and the high water mark.

3. Disconnect the battery.

4. If the waterline is above the dashboard the car could be totaled. However,
there is still significant value as many collector cars were restored from much
worse condition. You will still want to.

5. Establish a high-water mark. Look for water inside the doors and the taillights,
and dampness in the carpets and interior trim. This will allow you to focus on
cleaning areas that are most critical.

6. Mold and corrosion can start within 24-48 hours. Clean out the interior as
best you can using towels to absorb water. Keep the doors open, use a
shop vac to pull out the water and then use fans to help dry.

7. Even if you’re tempted, don’t try to start the car. If there’s water in the
engine, transmission or fuel system, you’ll just compound the damage.

8. Check the dipsticks for the engine and transmission. If water is present you
change the oil and filter.

9. Electrical systems on new cars are complex. However on classic cars this is
not typically the case and can be cleaned as well. If you are able, dry off
any connections you have access to.

10. Siphon the fuel out into a container and look for water. If water is present
you may need to have it cleaned professionally.

Remember, these suggestions are just the basics and are designed to keep the most parts of your collector car protected from the most serious damage in the initial hours after a flood. They also set the stage for a successful clean up by professionals.

Posted in: blog, Classic Car Insurance  

The Importance of Tire Maintenance

Frank recently retired and was excited to take his 1970 Plymouth Cuda out more often during his newfound free time. Frank loved his car but during his later working years he didn’t get many opportunities to drive his prized auto. Over the previous decade, Frank frequently tended to his Cuda and kept up with basic maintenance to avoid any issues with his vehicle. Frank never really thought to check were the tires since he rarely took the vehicle out on the road.

On a beautiful Saturday afternoon, Frank took his Cuda out for a ride on the highway. As he was gaining speed, the front right tire blew and the tread flew off. The distraction caused Frank to lose control of his vehicle striking a median on the highway. Luckily Frank was not hurt and no other vehicles were involved, but the freed tread damaged the fender and door area.

After having his vehicle towed to the body shop, Frank immediately reported the incident to Condon Skelly’s claims handling team. After completing the investigation and appraisal, it was determined that the failure was due to the age of the tire. Our claims team quickly completed the appraisal and issued payment to the body shop. Frank’s collector car was road ready in no time!

Frank thought his tires were perfectly fine to be on the road. The tread depth was in good condition as was the tire pressure. Frank did not even think about the fact that his tires were nearly 12 years old. As hard as it may be to dispose of an old tire with a healthy looking tread, that is exactly what Frank should have done. Studies show that a tire older than 7 years, regardless of use, poses an increased risk of failure. The chance of a failure increases significantly after 10 years.

Proper maintenance is key to protecting your collector vehicle and avoiding accidents. It is also important to clean up after an afternoon in the garage with your vehicle. Click here to read about the dangers of spontaneous combustion and how to prevent it.

History of the Classic and Collector Corvettes

In the 1950s, General Motors was so large that the U.S. Department of Justice threatened to break it up under antitrust regulations; however, it did not manufacture a sports car. So, after the idea was formed to create an affordable sports car under the GM brand, the Chevy Corvette emerged from Flint, Michigan in 1953. Since then, GM has continued their production–remaining extremely popular in the collector car circuit.

Only 300 Corvettes were manufactured in 1953, and their relatively weak engines made them more of a cruising car than a European-inspired racing car. However, the 1960s brought increased production levels and engine variety as well as special performance editions. With the 1963 Corvette Grand Sport, the brand distinguished itself as a successful race car producer.

Though production boomed from the late 60s to early 80s, this generation of Corvettes lacked quality and power. Fortunately, the C4 was released in 1984 and has gained popularity among collector car enthusiasts who are interested in classic Corvettes that can be driven frequently.

Since the C4, Corvette performance ratings have consistently increased. Current models are technologically advanced “supercars” that demonstrate top-line capabilities. With the brand returning to its glory days and gaining popularity in modern markets, collectors are also becoming more devoted to the classic Corvette. So, not only does the American sports car continue racing, but it’s classic models have become some of the most popular collector cars In the nation.

If you have an affinity for classic, collector Corvette’s, be sure to protect your investment. At Condon Skelly, we share your passion for these iconic vehicles. We’re a group of collectors, enthusiasts, and professionals who specialize in providing complete insurance for all types of collector and custom autos. We will help you secure affordable, industry-leading coverage to protect your classic, antique, or exotic vehicles. For more information, contact us today at (866) 291-5694.

Classic Muscle Cars: History and Significant Vehicles

Introduced in 1949, the American muscle car is defined by its lightweight body and powerful engine. These vehicles consistently dominated street and NASCAR racing, and the industry itself took off in the 1950s. In 1955, Chevrolet released the small block-V8, whose engine became a GM corporate standard for over 50 years. Then in 1964, the “Golden Age” of muscle cars began with the introduction of the Ford Mustang and Pontiac Tempest GTO. The classic Ford Mustang even gave birth to a new market for “pony cars,” which look similar to muscle cars but have significantly less power.

By 1975, governmental safety regulations, an international oil crisis, and high insurance costs led to the muscle car’s downfall. The cost of these vehicles rose dramatically, and Americans began purchasing small compact cars instead. However, collector car enthusiasts remain attached to their classic muscle cars.

Many of these enthusiasts consider Pontiac GTOs (“Goats”) to be the first muscle cars. The GTO became its own series in 1966, and in 1967 the 400 HO option with Ram Air induction became the top Pontiac performer. Of the 82,000 GTOs sold in 1967, 13,827 had the 400 HO option and Ram Air was installed on only 751. Pontiac’s classic muscle cars are often detected by their split grill front-end design, which remains one of the most recognizable features in the industry.

One classic muscle car that is particularly valuable is the 1966 Chevrolet Chevelle SS 396s with L78 engine option. Only 100 were produced, making it a rare find for collectors of Chevy classic muscle cars. The Chevelle is distinguished by its classic forward-thrusting front fenders, and the “Super Sport” version includes special wheel covers, red-line tires, and a black-out grill to emphasize the SS badging. Its L78 engine allowed the Chevelle to go 0-60mph in only 6.5 seconds!

Another rare find is Ford’s Mustang Boss 429. This classic model was designed in compliance with NASCAR regulations—with less than 1,400 units produced between 1969 and 1970. Though it did not have the most distinctive appearance or the strongest horsepower, the Boss 429 was praised for being practically hand-built. This is because its engine could not fit smoothly within a standard Mustang, and required extensive modification.

These are only a few examples of the classic muscle cars still collected today, and at Condon Skelly we share your passion for these powerful vehicles. We’re a group of collectors, enthusiasts, and professionals who specialize in providing complete insurance for all types of collector and custom vehicles—even a specific line of muscle car insurance! We will help you secure affordable, industry-leading specialty car insurance coverage to protect your classic, antique, or exotic vehicles. For more information, contact us today at (866) 291-5694.

Posted in: blog, Classic Car Insurance  

Six Quick Tips For Getting Classic Auto Insurance

Six Quick Tips For Getting Classic Auto Insurance

Getting Classic Auto Insurance, the classic car market is booming, despite what many nay-sayers have been forecasting in recent years. In fact, over 5 million classic, antique or vintage vehicles are on the road, and many more remain garaged. Evidence suggests that classic car collecting is by no means fading away. Classic vehicles remain an attractive hobby for many individuals with the discretionary income to spend on these often pricey investments, because of the heritage, community and recreational nature of auto collection. In fact, the internet has transformed the classic auto market, making it much easier to find and buy classic cars, source parts and it’s bringing owners together for community events, discussion groups and chatter about their passion and interest.

Those interested in classic cars understand the worth and value of these vehicles, as well as just how important it is to protect these assets for a variety of exposures. Whether in the shop, at a show, or out on the open road, classic cars have unique insurance needs.

Here are a few quick tips for securing a strong Classic Auto Insurance policy:

Get a quote. According to reports, over half of collectors don’t bother to get a classic car insurance quote from a specialty auto insurer, and end up paying much more through their standard insurance provider.

Know what it’s worth. Have your vehicle appraised to assess it’s current and projected market value. Doing so will help you determine just how much coverage you need to attain based on your vehicles worth.

Think ahead. While a traditional car insurance policy is determined based upon the value of your vehicle decreasing over time, a classic auto insurance policy is enacted on the basis that the value of the older vehicle will appreciate over time. Coverage should be high enough to cover the growing value of the vehicle and its parts.

Pay what you can. Deductibles should reflect your ability to pay for losses out-of-pocket. The higher your deductibles, the lower your premium rates will be.

Drive safely. According to industry data, a single traffic violation or ticket can raise a premium from 10-20 percent, even for classic car owners.

Invest in vehicle tracking. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for classic vehicles to go missing. Tracking products can greatly improve the chance of vehicle recovery and can often save vehicle owners money in the long run.

At Condon Skelly, we know how exciting collecting exotic, classic and sports cars can be. That’s why we specialize in offering complete classic auto insurance. We’re a group of collectors, enthusiasts, and professionals who specialize in insuring all types of collector vehicles. Our team is as passionate about protecting your vehicles as you are about collecting them. We can help you secure affordable, industry-leading specialty car insurance coverage to protect your classic, antique, or exotic vehicles. For more information about our classic car insurance, contact our specialists today at (866) 291-5694.

Specialty Car Insurance: Updated Classics, More than a Trend

Specialty Car Insurance Updated Classics, More than a Trend

In a recent post we discussed the emergence of the Revology Mustang as one of the most headline grabbing and eye catching auto revival initiatives of 2015. What we haven’t mentioned yet is that Revology is not alone in their efforts to bring classic auto into the 21st century with updated technology, performance, and luxury amenities. Revology is just one of a handful of specialty auto crafters popping up across the country that specialize in revamping classic rides. In the last few years a small but growing group of automakers around the world have been taking some of the most iconic cars ever built and updating them into thoroughly modern machines. In return, these revival vehicles have been met with both incredible praise, and harsh criticism from classic car enthusiasts.

There is no doubt that classic cars have an undeniable appeal, but as any auto enthusiast will confess vintage vehicles are not without their faults and flaws. While we might look back on classic rides through the proverbial rose colored glasses, many classic, antique and vintage vehicles leave much to be desired in terms of reliability, dependability and safety. Even in the best of shape and with impeccable upkeep vintage vehicles can be a handful and don’t often make the best daily drives. Which leaves many enthusiasts and collectors facing the conundrum of balancing their love for vintage aesthetics and tradition with their yearning for luxury, performance and convenience.

That’s where these replica and revival vehicles come into play. For years enthusiast have been updating their classics to enhance the driving experience. In fact, that’s what originally lead to many auto trends, such as hot-rodding. Proponents and producers of these modernized classics have been quick to point out just that. Supporters of these re-imagined classics assert that these vehicle, claim that they represent the prefect blend of automotive history, tradition and progress. These vehicles producers are coupling vintage styling and aesthetics appeal with the modern luxury amenities most consumers need in a daily driver to create a unique class of specialty vehicles to meet some enthusiasts’ demands. Many of these new autos offer top of the line vehicle technology in both safety and performance.

Whether you are a vintage auto purist or a specialty vehicle enthusiast, it is important to protect your ride. At Condon Skelly, we know how exciting collecting specialty, exotic, and classic cars can be. That’s why we specialize in offering complete specialty auto insurance. We’re a group of collectors, enthusiasts, and professionals who specialize in insuring all types of collector vehicles. Our team is as passionate about protecting your vehicles as you are about collecting them. We can help you secure affordable, industry-leading specialty car insurance coverage to protect your classic, antique, or exotic vehicles. For more information about our specialty car insurance, contact our specialists today at (866) 291-5694.

Vintage Auto Insurance: Focus on the Ford Fairlane

Vintage Auto Insurance: A Focus on the Ford Fairlane

 

To American film enthusiasts, the name Ford Fairlane is a reference to an obscure 1990 American action/comedy film directed by Renny Harlin and based on a short story series published in the 1979. However, classic Ford enthusiasts have a much different association with the name. In fact, many auto enthusiasts will tell you that the name of the film, and it’s main character, is actually derived from a line of vintage Ford vehicles produced between 1955 and 1970 with a unique place in collector’s hearts.

The Ford Fairlane line originated in 1955 to replace the Crestline as Ford’s premier full-size vehicle in the American auto market. The name was taken from Henry Ford’s estate in Michigan called Fair Lane. Originally, six different body styles were offered, all of which featured the iconic Fairlane stainless-steel body striping. The initial body styles included the Crown Victoria Skyliner which featured a tinted, transparent plastic roof, the Crown Victoria coupe which boasted a substantial increase in stainless-steel trimming compared to it’s standard Victoria coup counterpart, a convertible Sunliner, and simplistic traditional sedan.

The original design was quickly adapted by 1957 to reflect industry changes at the time. The new styling made the body wider and longer, with larger tail fins and a low wheelbase. The Fairlane 500 Skyliner was the first to feature a power retractable hardtop. Unlike most hard tops, the Fairlane 500 Skyliner’s solid top hinged and folded down into the trunk space at the touch of a button, unfortunately the top filled most of the trunk when retracted. While this made the model noteworthy and generated publicity, the feature was expensive and generated minimal sales. This second generation of Fairlane’s remain some of the most iconic in terms of 50’s styling and vintage appeal.

By 1962 the Fairlane line became Ford’s mi-sized vehicle offering, bridging the gap between the smaller Falcon and the full-sized luxury Galaxie, in order to compete with GM. Having moved out of the era of chrome, the Fairlane styling was updated to mirror the more boxy styling trends of the decade. As the muscle car market began to skyrocket, Ford responded with a Ford Fairlane Thunderbolt heavily modified for drag racing in1964. According to experts, less than 130 of these vehicles were ever produced, the first 11 Thunderbolts were released in “Vintage Burgundy” the remainder in white. Throughout the course of the mid to late1960’s the Fairlane began to embody sportiness both above and under the hood as it slowly morphed into the Torino series which would effectively replace the Fairlane in the 1970s.

At Condon Skelly, we know how exciting collecting exotic, classic and sports cars can be. That’s why we specialize in offering complete classic auto insurance. We’re a group of collectors, enthusiasts, and professionals who specialize in insuring all types of collector vehicles. Our team is as passionate about protecting your vehicles as you are about collecting them. We can help you secure affordable, industry-leading vintage auto insurance coverage to protect your classic, antique, or exotic vehicles. For more information about our classic car insurance, contact our specialists today at (866) 291-5694.

Classic Car Theft on the Rise, Is Your Ride Protected?

Classic Car Theft on the Rise, Is Your Ride Protected?

Imagine, you turn on the news only to see your prized classic vehicle battered and stranded by the side of the road. Having your vintage ride turn up missing would be painful enough, but the idea of finding it damaged after being stolen would be almost unbearable for many auto enthusiasts. While a strong antique classic car insurance policy can help mitigate the financial impacts, the moment would still likely be highly emotional.

Such could be the case if the owner of a stranded classic American muscle car steps up to claim their property. British police officials are making an international call to find the owner of a classic 1969 Chevrolet Impala Super Sport with plates registered in the US. According to reports, police have been desperately hunting the owner of the 1969 Impala after it was left abandoned in an intersection last month during rush hour traffic near London. The vehicles has suffered considerable amounts of damage to the the front bumper and hood but looks to have been in well-kept condition prior to the recent damage. The vehicle has an Idaho license plate which has been released through the media in hopes of alerting the owner who authorities believe might not even be aware that their Impala is missing. UK authorities believe that the vehicle may have been stolen and dumped by joyriders as the model is a rarity in the United Kingdom.

Classic vehicle theft is not as uncommon as many collectors would hope. In fact, there have been a number of recent reports of classic and vintage vehicle thefts over the last few months including the theft of another classic Chevy valued at over $45,000 from a Florida dealership and the theft or a rare 1987 Buick Grand National worth nearly $40,000 in Minnesota. Many of these thefts have taken place at restoration shops and dealerships. It is important that auto collectors choose their auto shops, dealers and storage facilities carefully in order to ensure that their vehicles are not only handles with care but protected in the event of a theft or break-in.

At Condon Skelly, we know how exciting collecting exotic, classic and sports cars can be. That’s why we specialize in offering complete classic auto insurance. We’re a group of collectors, enthusiasts, and professionals who specialize in insuring all types of collector vehicles. Our team is as passionate about protecting your vehicles as you are about collecting them. We can help you secure affordable, industry-leading specialty car insurance coverage to protect your classic, antique, or exotic vehicles. For more information about our classic car insurance, contact our specialists today at (866) 291-5694.

Vintage Auto Insurance: Diesel, a Love-Hate Story

Vintage Auto Insurance: Diesel, a Love-Hate Story

For decades auto makers and consumers have had a love-hate relationship with diesel engines. A true product of necessity, diesel vehicles have had a long history as commercial and industrial vehicles due to their durability and endurance. However it wasn’t until the late 1970’s when diesel engines became more of a consumer choice. While their rise and fall in the consumer market was rapid, auto markets have recently seen a growing surge of collector interest is these hard to find “modern classics”.

The first diesel automobile engines are accredited to the Mercedes-Benz 260 D available to consumers in 1936. Nearly 2,000 were produced through 1940 after which time consumer production halted to focus on military manufacturing. After World War II, the production of diesel engined vehicles was resumed with the Mercedes-Benz 170D n 1949. While they were very economical, consumers were largely unimpressed with the lack of speed, horsepower and performance diesel engines offered, as such many early diesel models fell to the wayside. Few of these models remain functional and intact as many fell victim to deterioration over the years, making diesel consumer Mercedes models rare and valuable collectibles. Mercedes eventually shifted their production of diesel vehicles to the commercial market, were many models were created for taxi, delivery vans and other work uses.

In 1967, the world’s first compact, high-speed diesel car was introduced as the Peugeot 204BD, however diesel engines did not fully gain popularity among consumers until the first fuel crisis that followed the Arab oil embargo of 1973. In a time when fuel prices were skyrocketing and shortages were abundant, diesel vehicles offered an affordable and spacious alternative to the compact gasoline models of the time and the clunky gas burning sedans that had nearly single digit fuel milage. While many diesel model sold well at the time, they were quickly replaced when the fuel crisis ended as consumer preferences changed.

Interest in diesel vehicles has seen a slight resurgence in recent years as consumers look for alternative to traditional gasoline as prices continue to rise. Many older diesel vehicles have been repurposed into bio-diesel compatible eco-friendly daily drivers. Other auto enthusiasts have begun to recognize the diesel cars of the past as collectables worth preserving and seeking out.

Whether you are into diesel classics or high powered gasoline performance machines, we can help protect your antique, vintage, classic and exotic rides with the vintage auto insurance you need. At Condon Skelly we write policies specifically designed for the classic, vintage and specialty vehicles. We strive to keep the insurance classic car owners need affordable so that you can spend more time on the road. Our policies cost about 60% less than standard auto insurance companies, and they’re designed specifically for unique needs of classic and collector cars. While many vintage auto insurance policies restrict usage to 6 months, we make sure you get the most enjoyment out of your vehicle by removing mileage caps. To learn more about us and our specialty vehicle insurance programs, contact us today at (855) 735-2844.